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Mauritania: Harratines protest slavery, discrimination

Mauritania: Harratines protest slavery, discrimination

Mauritania

Black Mauritanians, still called harratines, hit the streets of Nouakchott, the capital to protest against slavery.

During the march which coincided with the fourth anniversary of the Haratines Manifesto, protesters denounced continuous discrimination.

“I believe that the movement for the conquest of civil rights or social rights in Mauritania has seen a resurgence in recent years and today’s march is crowning the manifesto for political, economic and social rights for harratines within a united Mauritania. I believe that Mauritania, more than any other country, needs this movement which has worked hard to eliminate any legacy associated with slavery “ said organizer of the walk, Mohamed Fall Handayé.

Today, we have once again expressed unity. Together we are marching towards the future in unity, fighting against slavery and its aftermath. And also a process of progress and modernization in Mauritania.

Political party leaders supported the protest. President of the Manifesto, called on the Harratines and their former masters to work together in mutual respect, demanding social justice towards the Harratines.

Lawyer Ide Mbarek is President of the Manifesto of the Harratines.

“This manifesto represents a position expressed by the entire Mauritanian people against exclusion, marginalization and the fight against slavery and its aftermath. Today, we have once again expressed unity. Together we are marching towards the future in unity, fighting against slavery and its aftermath. And also a process of progress and modernization in Mauritania’‘, Mbarek said.

Africanews correspondent, Moulaye Najim Moulaye Zeine reports that the protesters also expressed their support to the Front Line Defenders , Moussa Bilal Biram and Abdellahi Matalla Saleck , as well as former Senator Mohamed Ould Ghadda.

Slavery was abolished in Mauritania in 1981, but the enforcement has been slow.

The first conviction for this practice was pronounced 35 years later, on 16 May 2016 by the Criminal Court Specialized in the fight against slavery in Eastern Mauritania.

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