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Boko Haram defeat tied to rescue of remaining Chibok girls – Buhari to Malala

Boko Haram defeat tied to rescue of remaining Chibok girls – Buhari to Malala

Nigeria

Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari has said defeat of terrorist group Boko Haram will be incomplete until the remaining Chibok girls are rescued.

Buhari’s new position on the terrorist group was in a letter to Pakistani Nobel laureate, Malala Yusafzai, who has repeatedly called on the government to do all it takes to rescue the remaining girls.

Buhari’s letter was in response to one that Malala addressed to him during the second anniversary of the abduction of the Chibok girls. The Ministry of Information added that the said letter also outlined efforts of the government as it tried to negotiate the release of the remaining girls.

The Federal Government believes that it is not too late for the girls to go back to school, and everything will be done to ensure that they continue the pursuit of their studies.

Touching on the release last October of 21 of the girls, Buhari said, ‘‘They are being given comprehensive medical, nutritional and psychological care and support, and anyone who has seen them in recent times will attest to the fact that their reintegration back to the society is progressing well.

‘‘The Federal Government believes that it is not too late for the girls to go back to school, and everything will be done to ensure that they continue the pursuit of their studies,” he added.

In 2015 months after assuming office, Buhari told the BBC that Boko Haram had been technically defeated. Last October, he reiterated that stands asserting that the group had been defeated in his independence day address.

The Army recently took over the bastion of the insurgents known as Camp Zero in the Sambisa Forest and has since planned to turn the place into a military training ground. The insurgents now use suicide bombers to attack civilian population in the country’s north east.

In a letter posted on the blog section of malala.org in April last year, she addressed the parents, sharing their grief two years on, adding that; ‘‘I think of you every day since we first met two years ago – and join millions of people around the world in praying for the safety and swift return of your girls.’‘

In 2013, Malala, who is the youngest-ever Nobel prize laureate was shot together with two friends by insurgents in her native Swat region while on her way to school. A global outcry followed after which she was flown abroad for treatment.

She has since ‘grown’ into a global voice that champions the interest of educating girls the world over. She was awarded the Nobel Peace prize in 2014.

Meanwhile, as part of the commemoration 1000 days in captivity, the Bring Back Our Girls campaign group are marching through the streets of Nigeria’s capital Abuja in a week of activism demanding more action from the government.

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