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UN chief holds talks with Kenyan President over South Sudan conflict

UN chief holds talks with Kenyan President over South Sudan conflict

Kenya

UN Secretary general Ban Ki Moon and Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta on Sunday called on South Sudan leaders to maintain peace in the world’s youngest nation.

Addressing a joint news conference in Nairobi, the UN chief warned South Sudan leaders had a duty to protect lives.

“I have urged leaders of South Sudan, the country, the newest country in the world, only 5 years old, to do much more for their future, for a better future. The two leaders of this country have now disappointed the world. The world who supported and who had good intentions to support it. “

Collective responsibility also means that they must immediately commit to the complete implementation of the peace agreement, including the permanent ceasefire and redeployment of military forces from Juba.

Kenyatta said regional leaders have a primary responsibility in maintaining peace in the region and called on the international community to support their efforts.

“We have all watched events in South Sudan with sorrow. Our youngest brother has fallen, yet again, into division and violence. It is our responsibility, all of us, but especially those in the region, to restore peace, and to restore it durably,” Kenyatta said.

“Let me be clear: those of us in the region have primary responsibility for peace and security here. But that responsibility is also collective, all of us must think carefully, and work hard, in the cause of peace.”

He called for a review of the mandate of the United Nations Mission in South Sudan so that it can robustly enforce it in the country.

“The UN Security Council would be well advised to vary the mandate of UNMISS so that it can separate those who have turned to violence, so that it can protect the infrastructure South Sudan has built, and so that it can enforce the peace,” he said.

The Kenyan leader also commended South Sudanese leaders for agreeing to cease hostilities, saying it needs to be enforced fully without any delay.

“Collective responsibility also means that they must immediately commit to the complete implementation of the peace agreement, including the permanent ceasefire and redeployment of military forces from Juba,” he said.

Kenyatta said all parties to the conflict have to submit themselves to the joint security agreements, especially those establishing the joint integrated police units to patrol Juba.

Fighting between the Sudan People’s Liberation Army (SPLA) loyal to President Salva Kiir and the SPLA in Opposition, which backs First Vice-President Riek Machar, reportedly killed some 272 people, including 33 civilians, and displaced at least 36,000 civilians.

The mass displacements have sparked renewed concerns about the prospects for peace and stability in the country.

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