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Al-Shabaab confirms death of Garissa attacks mastermind

Al-Shabaab confirms death of Garissa attacks mastermind

Somalia

Somali militant group al-Shabaab have finally confirmed the death of one of its commanders, Mohamed Mohamud Ali, alias Dulyadin, widely believed to be the mastermind behind the deadly attack on Garissa University in Kenya.

The group after a long silence since the death was reported by Somali authorities early this month, finally released an obituary confirming the death and referring to Dulyadin as a martyr who was slain by US crusader.

“We console ourselves and our nation for the martyrdom of the Muslim knight commander Sheik Mohamed Mohamud Ali (Dulyadin). May Allah accept him and lift him to paradise,” the obituary read.

We console ourselves and our nation for the martyrdom of the Muslim knight commander Sheik Mohamed Mohamud Ali (Dulyadin). May Allah accept him and lift him to paradise.

According to al-Shabaab, “Kuno” and “Gamadhere” as he was also known, was killed by “US Crusaders,” in apparent reference to the fact that Somalia’s special forces are backed by the US with training and logistical support.

According to Somali officials, Ali died in a Somali special forces raid close to the southern port town of Kismayo.

Mohamud Ali, is a Kenyan national and an ethnic Somali, he was reportedly killed along with three other commanders following which his body was later put on display by local authorities.

The Garissa attack

The Garissa University College attack occurred a little over a year ago (April 2015), 365km northeast of the Kenyan capital Nairobi, and resulted in the loss of 148 lives including 142 students.

Most victims were killed in their dormitories, whiles others were gathered and executed in a hall of residence. According to reports, the entire operation was carried out by four al-Shabab fighters.

In the wake of the attacks, the Kenyan government ramped up its offensive on the group resulting in huge casualties on the group but also on Kenya’s security forces.

The attack was the second bloodiest in Kenya since al-Qaeda bombed the US embassy in Nairobi in 1998, killing 213 people.