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Somaliland's education still struggling - Investors

Somaliland's education still struggling - Investors

Education

After attaining its independence in 1991, Somaliland has continued to advance in certain fields.

But the education sector remains less structured and developed. Investors now claim that universities are not supported by the public service. The country currently has over 30 private centres for higher education. Private educators and Middle East based charitable organizations filled the vacuum with various ideological and educational objectives.

In post war Somaliland from 1994 onwards, the state tried to revive the collapsed educational system with help from United Nations and international organizations. A couple of times Somaliland national curriculum have been reviewed with the help of United Nations agencies such as UNESCO.

The Ministry of Education has imposed programs up to the end of the second cycle. The universities are now left with a gap.

“The Ministry of Education has imposed programs up to the end of the second cycle. The universities are now left with a gap. We are here to provide a service to the community, and I would also like to see my students embrace this idea of social commitment,” said Dr. Hussein Bulhane, director of Frantz Fanon University in Somaliland.

Students like Halam have a clear idea of what they want, that can be attained through higher education.

“Therefore the main reason for why I chose this faculty is that I want to help my people. My goal after the university is to help all the mentally disabled who need it, and create a large institution that will teach psychology.”

Somaliland has had to develop a strong entrepreneurial streak since 1991 and its declaration of independence from Somalia never being recognised by the international community, leaving it to rebuild its shattered economy and infrastructure alone following a civil war. The country is a former British colony.