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Sudanese journalists decry dangerous work terrain

Sudanese journalists decry dangerous work terrain

Sudan

Sudanese journalists are concerned about the working conditions of media professionals in the country.

In February this year, the national intelligence and security service seized print runs of 14 newspapers without stating the reasons for their actions.

Local press say Sudanese officials find critical writing, handling of topics like corruption and writing on the way forward for the economy a bitter pill to swallow.

There are some undeclared red lines. At anytime, maybe you can cross any of this red lines and then you find yourself closed again.

Independent news outlets like Al-Tayar have complained that the situation remains the same despite pressure from the press.

“There are some undeclared red lines. At anytime, maybe you can cross any of this red lines and then you find yourself closed again,” Osman Mirgani, Editor-in-Chief of Al-Tayar said.

On several occasions the media watchdog, Reporters Without Borders has denounced the attitude of the National Intelligence and security service.

NGOs have called on Sudanese authorities to check these measures considered as a serious infringement on freedom of speech .

“The problem we are facing now is just because the way the government is thinking, unless this way changes, we are thinking nothing will be changed,” Mirgani added.

Sometimes Sudanese journalists use hunger strike to protest the suspension of their newspapers.

The local journalists union recently held talks with the UN Independent expert on the situation of human rights in Sudan, Aristide Nonsonsi during which they decried the working conditions of journalists in Sudan.

A recent press freedom classification by Reporters Without Borders places at the 174th position out of 180 countries.